Tag Archives: Greenville history

Joyeux Noel

Last night I watched Joyeux Noel, a 2005 Academy Award Nominee for Best Foreign Language Film.  If you want to watch a movie that really captures the meaning of Christmas, go out and rent this film today!  It is set in 1914 and tells the story of  one Christmas night during WWI when enemies were able to lay aside their differences, visit each others trenches and celebrate the holiday.  Diane Kruger is beautiful in it, and I adore her clothes.  I have never paid much attention to 1910’s and 20’s fashion, but recently I have been drawn to their silhouette.  So, watch this movie, and Joyeux Noel!

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Filed under fashion, History, Movies

Jerry’s Curb Service

If you live in Greenville, you may have seen this sign over on Woodruff Rd.  The restaurant has been closed down for as long as I remember, but the sign is still there.  I pass it all the time, but it was only last week that I thought about stopping to take a picture.  I don’t know anything about Jerry’s, but I just love the girl in her car hop outfit!  If you know anything about this restaurant, let me know!

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Filed under Local Businesses, Photos

She’s a WOW

I have been researching the depiction of women in WW II propaganda posters for a new set of paintings.  Some of them are very familiar, like Rosie the Riveter, but others I had never seen before.  I just had to share a few of my favorites.  Pics are from allposters.com.

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Filed under ads, History, Photos

In my own backyard

Photo couresly coutureallure.blogspot.com

Photo couresly coutureallure.blogspot.com

I have mentioned before how much I love the idea of vintage train travel.  My only train trip that I remember was a brief trip on the TGV from Paris to Lille in the north of France.  But, I can imagine lounging in the club car as the countryside goes speeding past.  I recently re-read Agatha Christi’s Murder on the Orient Express, and aside from the whole murder thing, it all seems so wonderful and glamorous.  These photos from Couture Allure perfectly illustrate my dream of what train travel should be.

I spend most days in my studio looking out on this sight:

photo courtesy greenvillesouth.com

photo courtesy greenvillesouth.com

This photo is a little old, but you can see the concrete piers that cross the river.  These are all that remain of the old “Swamp Rabbit” train trestles.  The railroad, built in 1888 only ran 15 miles because of insufficient funds to complete the route.  It was demolished in 1990, and the piers became an integral part of the Reedy River dam (they also make a nice place for the ducks to lay out in the sun!)

I am also often asked if I know what the Wyche Pavillion (the brick building in the photo) originally was.  It was build in 1904 as a carriage house paint shop, but in 1925 was turned into the first factory for the production of Duke’s Mayonnaise.  So, now you know!

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A Glance at Greenville’s history

As the Oil and Rouge event celebrates vintage art and style in Greenville, I  decided to start my blog posts with a glance at Greenville’s history.  Greenville is most well known for being the home of some of the nations largest textile mills.  Thousands of workers moved into the town’s cookie-cutter mill houses.

Camperdown 1910 Falls on The Reedy River

During WWI, Greenville was also the home of 100,000 soldiers trained at Camp Sevier just outside the city, and the Donaldson Air Base brought thousands of airmen to Greenville following WWII.

Photo Courtesy the Greenville Co. Historical Society, The Cox Collection

Photo Courtesy the Greenville Co. Historical Society, The Cox Collection

Photo Courtesy Bessettefamilies.com

Photo Courtesy Bessettefamilies.com

You can still see glimpses of Greenville’s history as you walk around the city, despite the vast renovations that have taken place in recent years.  For small town America, colorful building signs would have been a beautiful way to brighten up building facades and attract customers.  Although they have mostly faded away, a few of these signs are still visible around Greenville.  I took these photos on an excursion around the city looking for painting inspirations. What glimpses of history have you seen around Greenville?

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~Emily C.

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